Lindsay Graham’s Challenger Takes Unprecedented Step

South Carolina Republican Senator Lindsay Graham became a household name during the confirmation hearing of Supreme Court Justice Brett Kavanaugh after he vehemently stood up to his Democratic counterparts for what he considered a gross miscarriage of justice toward the Catholic father of two.

Graham, who (at the time) served on the committee, chaired by Iowa Republican Senator Chuck Grassley, solidified his sympathies for anyone victimized by the radical left, who so plainly demonstrated their willingness to make underhanded political moves when they were left lacking in congressional votes to support their cause.

After Grassley’s move to chair the Senate Finance Committee, it was Graham that took his illustrious place as the chairman of the Senate Judiciary Committee and now faces another high court confirmation that is starting out even more contentious than the last.

To complicate matters, not only is the Republican-controlled Senate looking to confirm a nominee before the upcoming presidential election but Graham is also himself fighting an expensive re-election campaign, and his competitor isn’t pulling any punches.

Looking to unseat him is 44-year-old former lobbyist Jaime Harrison who has had plenty of material from the Democratic playbook to beat Graham about the head and shoulders with.

On Saturday Harrison attended his debate with Graham by bringing a large plexiglass screen to stand behind when speaking with his opponent, according to The New York Post. Despite the pair being an estimated 13 feet apart, and Graham having tested negative the day before, Harrison was able to silently keep a giant telegraphing reminder to those concerned about the coronavirus pandemic that his party is taking it more seriously than his opponents.

“Tonight I am taking it seriously. That’s why I put this plexiglass up,” Harrison said from the debate stage according to the Post. To make the image even more ridiculous, Harrison and Graham debated “in a mostly empty room at Allen University, a historically Black institution in Columbia,” according to the news journal.

Harrison said that the COVID-19 pandemic  “impacted [him] personally” after a grand-aunt died in July “in a nursing home, by herself.”

“It’s not just about me, it’s about the people in my life that I have to take care of as well, my two boys, my wife, my grandmother,” Harrison said.

“Let’s take this issue seriously and do all that we can to not only take care of ourselves but each other,” Harrison added.

Graham’s Senate re-election campaign took a surprising turn for the worse when it became apparent that Democrats were bent on removing him from his prestigious position in Congress.

“I’m getting overwhelmed,” Graham told conservative talk-show host Sean Hannity Thursday night. “LindseyGraham.com. Help me.”

Graham’s somewhat rattled plea came due to the massive monetary support being funneled toward Harrison:

“My opponent will raise $100 million in the state of South Carolina,” Graham said according to The Hill. “The most money ever spent in the history of the state on a Senate race in this state was by me in 2014 when I spent $13 million…I’m being killed financially. This money is because they hate my guts.”

Graham is convinced, like many conservatives, that confirming President Donald Trump’s nomination to the high court will serve the nation’s interest and support the war against outright communism over the next thirty years. Distracting the chairman of the Senate Judiciary Committee will no doubt be helpful for those who don’t want a new justice confirmed before Nov. 3.

Graham, however, is dedicated to confirming the president’s nominee:

“According to the standing rules of the U.S. Senate, committees may convene regardless of whether or not the Senate is in session,” Graham said in a statement according to Fox News.

 

“The Senate Judiciary Committee, chaired by U.S. Sen. Lindsey Graham, R-S.C., will proceed with the consideration of the nomination of Judge Amy Coney Barrett to be an associate justice on the Supreme Court of the United States on Oct. 12, 2020.”

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